Who Made a Mercury Pickup Truck?

Who Made a Mercury Pickup Truck?

Mercury pickup trucks were produced for a short period of time in the United States, from 1938 to 1947. The trucks were manufactured by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company and were based off of Ford’s line of pickups from the same era.

The first Mercury pickup was the 1939 Model 9CM. It was offered in three different body styles, including a two-door coupe, four-door sedan, and five-window cab.

The 9CM had an inline six-cylinder engine that produced 95 horsepower and a three-speed manual transmission. It also had a wheelbase of 116 inches and had a payload capacity of 1,800 pounds.

The next model year saw some updates, including the introduction of the 9CM Deluxe Cab model. This model had larger windows and was available with either two or four doors. The engine was also upgraded to produce 105 horsepower and could now haul up to 2,000 pounds with its extended wheelbase of 119 inches.

In 1941, Mercury introduced its last pickup truck model before World War II intervened: the Model 10CM. This model featured an upgraded engine that produced 115 horsepower and could haul up to 2,400 pounds with its extended wheelbase of 122 inches. After WWII ended in 1945, production resumed on the 10CM but it did not last long as it was discontinued in 1947 due to low sales and competition from other brands such as Chevrolet and Dodge.

Mercury’s pickups remain highly sought after by collectors today due to their classic styling and rarity. While they are not as popular as their Ford counterparts, they are still beloved by many enthusiasts who appreciate their unique look style and historical significance.

In conclusion, Mercury pickup trucks were made for a short period between 1938 and 1947 by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company based off of Ford’s line of pickups from that era. Although they remain rare today due to their low production numbers during that time period, many collectors still seek out these classic vehicles for their unique styling and historical value.

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Karen Watkins